The STRANDS Project: Long-Term Autonomy in Everyday Environments

Nick Hawes, Chris Burbridge, Ferdian Jovan, Lars Kunze, Bruno Lacerda, Lenka Mudrová, Jay Young, Jeremy Wyatt, Denise Hebesberger, Tobias Körtner, Rares Ambrus, Nils Bore, John Folkesson, Patric Jensfelt, Lucas Beyer, Alexander Hermans, Bastian Leibe, Aitor Aldoma, Thomas Fäulhammer, Michael Zillich, Markus Vincze, Muhannad Al-Omari, Eris Chinellato, Paul Duckworth, Yiannis Gatsoulis, David Hogg, Anthony Cohn, Christian Dondrup, Jaime Fentanes, Tomas Krajník, João Santos, Tom Duckett, Marc Hanheide
IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine

Thanks to the efforts of our community, autonomous robots are becoming capable of ever more complex and impressive feats. There is also an increasing demand for, perhaps even an expectation of, autonomous capabilities from end-users. However, much research into autonomous robots rarely makes it past the stage of a demonstration or experimental system in a controlled environment. If we don't confront the challenges presented by the complexity and dynamics of real end-user environments, we run the risk of our research becoming irrelevant or ignored by the industries who will ultimately drive its uptake. In the STRANDS project we are tackling this challenge head-on. We are creating novel autonomous systems, integrating state-of-the-art research in artificial intelligence and robotics into robust mobile service robots, and deploying these systems for long-term installations in security and care environments. To date, over four deployments, our robots have been operational for a combined duration of 2545 hours (or a little over 106 days), covering 116km while autonomously performing end-user defined tasks. In this article we present an overview of the motivation and approach of the STRANDS project, describe the technology we use to enable long, robust autonomous runs in challenging environments, and describe how our robots are able to use these long runs to improve their own performance through various forms of learning.



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